Spotlight on MG author Emma Carroll

To celebrate the upcoming publication of Emma Carroll’s exciting new book, The Week at World’s End, I’ll be taking a look at Emma’s work, how she researches her novels, and the events that prompted her to start writing. If you love historical MG stories with strong female characters, then read on! Best friends Stevie andContinue reading “Spotlight on MG author Emma Carroll”

Dear Wit: Letters from the World’s Wits

Dear Sir: I like words. I like fat buttery words, such as ooze, turpitude, glutinous, toady. I like solemn, angular, creaky words, such as straitlaced, cantankerous, pecunious, valedictory. I like spurious, black-is-white words, such as mortician, liquidate, tonsorial, demi-monde. I like suave “V” words, such as Svengali, svelte, bravura, verve. I like crunchy, brittle, cracklyContinue reading “Dear Wit: Letters from the World’s Wits”

Maeve Binchy on what makes a page turner

Page-turn·er  n. Informal – A very interesting, exciting, or suspenseful book, usually a novel. Today, in our writers corner is a short video clip of Maeve Binchy speaking about characterization and what makes a page turning story. I think Maeve picks up on some important points here in a nicely succinct and encouraging way. Pace is, of course,Continue reading “Maeve Binchy on what makes a page turner”

Children’s classic fiction – the favourites, part 1

Today, in light of my recent post on the Vintage Children’s Reading Challenge, I want to do a whistle-stop tour of some of my favourite classic books and their authors. Just thinking back to these wonderful childhood reads got me all misty-eyed and nostalgic. Some of these books might be new to you but someContinue reading “Children’s classic fiction – the favourites, part 1”

Uncle Montague’s Tales of Terror

On my reading table at the moment is Chris Priestley’s highly entertaining and spooky read Uncle Montague’s Tales of Terror. I’ve been meaning to get round to reading this one for a while, too long really as there are now more in the series to catch up with. The book can be read as aContinue reading “Uncle Montague’s Tales of Terror”

Tove Jansson

In terms of embarrassing confessions how does the fact that I completely missed Tove Jansson as a child rate? Pretty highly I would think, a bit like saying that you never ate a rusk before or never painted a finger-painting, but there you are. I came across a BBC programme about her a short while ago and apart fromContinue reading “Tove Jansson”